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Las Palmas Pharmacy
   

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Las Palmas Pharmacy
555 E. Tachevah Drive 1W101
Palm Springs, CA 92262
Located in Las Palmas Medical Plaza

Phone:  (760) 416-0830
Fax: (760) 416-0832

Store Hours
Monday - Friday:  9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Saturday: Closed
Sunday: Closed

 

Interested in our other locations?
Fireside Pharmacy
La Quinta Pharmacy

 

Supporting Literature

The following finding that conjugated equine estrogen but not esterified estrogen was associated with venous thrombotic risk may have implications for the choice of hormones in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

JAMA. 2004 Oct 6;292(13):1581-7
Esterified estrogens and conjugated equine estrogens and the risk of venous thrombosis.

Smith NL, Heckbert SR, Lemaitre RN, Reiner AP, Lumley T, Weiss NS, Larson EB, Rosendaal FR, Psaty BM.
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. nlsmith@u.washington.edu
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

These observations suggest that the addition of testosterone to conventional hormone therapy for postmenopausal women does not increase and may indeed reduce the hormone therapy-associated breast cancer risk-thereby returning the incidence to the normal rates observed in the general, untreated population.

Menopause. 2004 Sep-Oct;11(5):531-5
Breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women using testosterone in addition to usual hormone therapy.

Dimitrakakis C, Jones RA, Liu A, Bondy CA.
Developmental Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

The pharmacodynamic differences of testosterone and methyltestosterone are briefly reviewed in the context of choice for individualized clinical use.

Mayo Clin Proc. 2004 Apr;79(4 Suppl):S8-13
Hot flashes and androgens: a biological rationale for clinical practice.

Notelovitz M.
Adult Women's Health & Medicine, Boca Raton, Fla, USA. mnotelo@aol.com
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

The results of this study suggest a significant reduction in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in our population of non-obese, healthy postmenopausal women who used transdermal 17-beta-estradiol. This could suggest that, in some women, the estrogen deficiency that occurs after menopause could represent a fundamental step in the process of diabetogenesis.

Diabetes Care. 2004 Mar;27(3):645-9
Transdermal 17-beta-estradiol and risk of developing type 2 diabetes in a population of healthy, nonobese postmenopausal women.

Rossi R, Origliani G, Modena MG.
Institute of Cardiology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. rossi.r@policlinico.mo.it
The full text article is available FREE online:  
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/27/3/645

Mayo Clinic researchers surveyed 176 women taking natural bio-identical micronized progesterone who had previously taken synthetic progestins. After one to six months, the women reported an overall 34% increase in satisfaction on micronized progesterone compared to their previous HRT, reporting these improvements: 50% in hot flashes, 42% in depression, and 47% in anxiety. Micronized progesterone was also more effective in controlling breakthrough bleeding.

J Womens Health Gend Based Med 2000 May;9(4):381-7
Comparison of regimens containing oral micronized progesterone or medroxyprogesterone acetate on quality of life in postmenopausal women: a cross-sectional survey.

Fitzpatrick LA, Pace C, Wiita B.
Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Fertil Steril 1999 Sep;72(3):389-97
Micronized progesterone: clinical indications and comparison with current treatments.

Fitzpatrick LA, Good A.
Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2000 Dec;36(7):2154-9
Natural progesterone, but not medroxyprogesterone acetate, enhances the beneficial effect of estrogen on exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in postmenopausal women.

Rosano GM, Webb CM, Chierchia S, Morgani GL, Gabraele M, Sarrel PM, de Ziegler D, Collins P.
Department of Cardiology, Ospedale San Raffaele, Rome, Italy.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

The PEPI Trial, a 3-year multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 875 healthy postmenopausal women, confirmed that synthetic progestins partially negate the beneficial effects on cholesterol levels that result from taking estrogen. Natural bio-identical progesterone, on the other hand, maintains all the benefits of estrogen on cholesterol without any of the side effects associated with synthetic progestins, such as medroxyprogesterone acetate.

JAMA 1995 Jan 18;273(3):199-208
Effects of estrogen or estrogen/progestin regimens on heart disease risk factors in postmenopausal women. The Postmenopausal Estrogen/Progestin Interventions (PEPI) Trial.

The Writing Group for the PEPI Trial.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Certain progestogens, such as micronized progesterone, can be administered concurrently with estrogen replacement therapy, providing protection against endometrial hyperplasia without significantly affecting the beneficial effects of estrogen on lipid profiles, atherosclerosis and vascular reactivity.

J Reprod Med 2000 Mar;45(3 Suppl):245-58
Rationale for hormone replacement therapy in atherosclerosis prevention.

Wagner JD
Comparative Medicine Clinical Research Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2002;87:1062-1067
Estrogen status correlates with the calcium content of coronary atherosclerotic plaques in women.

Christian RC, Harrington S, Edwards WD, Oberg AL, Fitzpatrick LA.
Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

J Neurosci. 2003 Dec 10;23(36):11420-6
Estradiol attenuates programmed cell death after stroke-like injury.

Rau SW, Dubal DB, Bottner M, Gerhold LM, Wise PM.
Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky 40536, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Endocrinology 2001 Mar 1;142(3):969-973
Minireview: Neuroprotective Effects of Estrogen-New Insights into Mechanisms of Action.

Wise PM, Dubal DB, Wilson ME, Rau SW, Bottner M
Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

The use of conjugated equine estrogen plus medroxyprogesterone acetate in a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of 16,608 postmenopausal women between the ages of 50 and 79 years doubled the risk of venous thrombosis. This horse estrogen plus synthetic progestin therapy increased the risks associated with age, overweight or obesity, and factor V Leiden.

JAMA. 2004 Oct 6;292(13):1573-80
Estrogen plus progestin and risk of venous thrombosis.

Cushman M, Kuller LH, Prentice R, Rodabough RJ, Psaty BM, Stafford RS, Sidney S, Rosendaal FR; Women's Health Initiative Investigators.
Department of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington 05446, USA. mary.cushman@uvm.edu
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Chem Res Toxicol 1998 Sep;11(9):1105-11
The equine estrogen metabolite 4-hydroxyequilenin causes DNA single-strand breaks and oxidation of DNA bases in vitro.

Chen Y, Shen L, Zhang F, Lau SS, van Breemen RB, Nikolic D, Bolton JL
Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy (M/C 781), College of Pharmacy, The University of Illinois at Chicago, IL, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

The following study concluded that in non-human primates, medroxyprogesterone in contrast to progesterone increases the risk of coronary vasospasm. Progesterone plus estradiol protected but medroxyprogesterone plus estradiol failed to protect, allowing vasospasm.

Nat Med 1997 Mar;3(3):324-7
Medroxyprogesterone interferes with ovarian steroid protection against coronary vasospasm.

Miyagawa K, Rosch J, Stanczyk F, Hermsmeyer K.
Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, Oregon 97006, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

MPA reduces the dilatory effect of estrogens on coronary arteries, increases the progression of coronary artery atherosclerosis, accelerates low-density lipoprotein uptake in plaque, increases the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques and promotes insulin resistance and its consequent hyperglycemia. These effects may be largely limited to MPA and not shared with other progestogens.

J Reprod Med  1999 Feb;44(2 Suppl):180-4
Progestogens and cardiovascular disease. A critical review.

Clarkson TB.
Comparative Medicine Clinical Research Center, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Significant bone loss occurs during the 10 to 15 years before menopause when estrogen levels are still normal. Progesterone can stimulate new bone formation in women with osteoporosis.  Dr. Prior measured estrogen and progesterone levels in female marathon runners who had osteoporosis. Although their estrogen levels were still high, they had stopped ovulating (common in female athletes) and progesterone levels had fallen, triggering the onset of osteoporosis. This can indicate a role for progesterone use, alone or combined with estrogen which reduces bone loss, in improving Bone Mineral Density.

Endocr Rev 1990 May;11(2):386-98
Progesterone as a bone-trophic hormone.

Prior JC.
Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

The WHI assessed the major health benefits and risks of the most commonly used combined hormone preparation in the United States, the synthetic combination of conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate. Absolute excess risks per 10,000 person-years attributable to this synthetic hormone combination were 7 more CHD events, 8 more strokes, 8 more pulmonary emboli, and 8 more invasive breast cancers, while absolute risk reductions per 10,000 person-years were 6 fewer colorectal cancers and 5 fewer hip fractures.

JAMA. 2002 Jul 17;288(3):321-33
Risks and benefits of estrogen plus progestin in healthy postmenopausal women: principal results From the Women's Health Initiative randomized controlled trial.

Rossouw JE, Anderson GL, Prentice RL, LaCroix AZ, Kooperberg C, Stefanick ML, Jackson RD, Beresford SA, Howard BV, Johnson KC, Kotchen JM, Ockene J; Writing Group for the Women's Health Initiative Investigators.
Division of Women's Health Initiative, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6705 Rockledge Dr, One Rockledge Ctr, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20817, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Among postmenopausal women aged 65 years or older, synthetic estrogen plus progestin did not improve cognitive function when compared with placebo. However, typical HRT users are in their 50s and this study focused on women aged 65 and over, who have a higher risk for dementia.

JAMA  2003 May 28;289(20):2663-72
Effect of estrogen plus progestin on global cognitive function in postmenopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study: a randomized controlled trial.

Rapp SR, Espeland MA, Shumaker SA, Henderson VW, Brunner RL, Manson JE, Gass ML, Stefanick ML, Lane DS, Hays J, Johnson KC, Coker LH, Dailey M, Bowen D; WHIMS Investigators.
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

Estrogen plus progestin increases the risk of ischemic stroke in generally healthy postmenopausal women. This finding is consistent with the differences noted earlier between synthetic medroxyprogesterone acetate and bio-identical progesterone.

JAMA 2003 May 28;289(20):2673-84
Effect of estrogen plus progestin on stroke in postmenopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative: a randomized trial.

Wassertheil-Smoller S, Hendrix SL, Limacher M, Heiss G, Kooperberg C, Baird A, Kotchen T, Curb JD, Black H, Rossouw JE, Aragaki A, Safford M, Stein E, Laowattana S, Mysiw WJ; WHI Investigators.
Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.
Click here to access the PubMed abstract of this article.

 

 

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